Vaccines for tropical and infectious diseases: from insights to the reality

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07/01/2019
Vaccines for tropical and infectious diseases: from insights to the reality

Call for papers in the Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases

Edited by Arturo Reyes-Sandoval and Marco Antonio Stephano

By the end of the 18th century, the observation that cowpox infection seemed to protect humans against smallpox lead the English physician Edward Jenner to inoculate a boy with cowpox matter from a hand blister of a milkmaid. Jenner then repeatedly exposed the boy to smallpox— who remained ill-free. Smallpox immunization was first demonstrated, marking the birth of vaccination.

Early during the 19th century, two human viral vaccines (against smallpox and rabies) and three bacterial vaccines (against typhoid, cholera and plague) became available. During the 20th century, additional vaccines that protect against once commonly fatal infections such as pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, rubella, and several other communicable diseases were developed.

Vaccination is one of the greatest public health achievements of human history. Each year, vaccines prevent more than 2.5 million child deaths globally. An additional 2 million child deaths could be prevented each year through immunization with currently available vaccines.

Considering the relevance of this issue, the Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases is calling for papers in a thematic series on “Vaccines for tropical and infectious diseases: from insights to the reality” edited by Prof. Arturo Reyes-Sandoval (Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, UK) and Prof. Marco Antonio Stephano (School of Pharmaceutical Science, São Paulo University, Brazil).

The aim of this thematic series is to disseminate research on the different aspects of vaccines, including various development stages, testing and deployment with the final objective to prevent tropical and infectious diseases such as dengue, malaria, yellow fever, ebola, hemorrhagic fever, influenza, Japanese encephalitis, tuberculosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, African meningitis, kala azar, food-borne trematodiases, soil-transmitted helminthiases and other neglected diseases.

The submission deadline is March 1st, 2020.

Manuscripts should be formatted according to our submission guidelines and submitted via the online submission system. Please also indicate clearly in the covering letter that the manuscript is to be considered for the “Vaccines for tropical and infectious diseases: from insights to the reality” series.

If you would like to enquiry about the suitability of a manuscript for consideration, please email a pre-submission enquiry to editorial.jvatitd@unesp.br.

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